Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence
Assessments & Coaching

We assess and develop emotional intelligence in leaders and teams at work.

Jeff Hemmelgarn

Facilitator | Certified Emotional Quotient Analyst (CPEQA)

Emotional Intelligence

Emotional
Intelligence
Assessments

Jeff Hemmelgarn

Certified EQ Facilitator

We assess and develop emotional intelligence in leaders and teams at work.

What is emotional intelligence?

Emotional intelligence quotient improves problem solving and decision-making skills.

Emotional intelligence is the ability to ability to sense, understand, regulate, and effectively apply the power of your emotions—especially in the decision-making process.

Along with IQ, emotional intelligence is critical in facilitating high levels of collaboration and productivity at work. It’s also a required ingredient for achieving superior performance as a leader. No doubt that the World Economic Forum says that EI is a Top 10 job skill required to survive the fourth industrial revolution.

Emotional quotient (EQ) is the measurement of emotional intelligence.

Emotional Intelligence
Emotional quotient (EQ) assessments measure 5 dimensions of emotional intelligence:
  • Self-Awareness: Understanding our own moods and emotions, as well as their effect on others.
  • Self-Regulation: Our ability to control or redirect disruptive impulses and moods; to think before we act.
  • Motivation: Our passion to work for reasons beyond money or status; how we pursue goals with energy and persistence.
  • Social Awareness: Our ability to understand the emotional makeup of other people.
  • Social Regulation: Our proficiency in managing relationships and building networks.
Emotional Intelligence
Emotional quotient (EQ) assessments measure 5 dimensions of emotional intelligence:
  • Motivation: Our passion to work for reasons beyond money or status; how we pursue goals with energy and persistence.
  • Self-Awareness: Understanding our own moods and emotions, as well as their effect on others.
  • Self-Regulation: Our ability to control or redirect disruptive impulses and moods; to think before we act.
  • Social Awareness: Our ability to understand the emotional makeup of other people.
  • Social Regulation: Our proficiency in managing relationships and building networks.

The role of emotional intelligence in superior decision-making.

For thousands (nay, millions) of years, leaders have relied on “gut instinct” to make critical decisions and solve problems. Now we know that gut instinct is not much more than simply relying on our raw emotions. Caution! Emotions are fast, decisive, and stubborn. They can often lead us down the wrong path, especially when acted upon without due consideration.

Great leaders choose to manage and develop their emotional intelligence as a strategic advantage to problem-solving and decision-making. Explore the influence of emotional intelligence on superior decision-making at work (below):

Emotional Intelligence
Emotional Quotient (EQ)

Emotional intelligence is the first step in decision-making and it will be involved every step of the way to completion. Having the most appropriate emotional reaction will start all of the other physiological reactions (i.e., cognition, behaviors, and competency) on the right foot.

For example, a leader may be emotionally excited to set next year’s financial goals, and determined to meet them. Therefore, he or she draws upon business school knowledge, applies the lessons learned from last year’s strategy meeting, conveys confidence in the session, applies their skills as a good negotiator, and the ultimate decision is made.

Conversely, let’s say that same leader just ended an important personal relationship the night before the meeting. (We’ve all been there.) The leader’s thoughts are occupied by what went wrong in their relationship, and they don’t have the energy to invoke their financial knowledge. The leader is reserved in the meeting and as others look to them for answers, they struggle to contribute or inspire confidence in others. Ultimately, mistakes are repeated that could have been avoided if the leader was more engaged and emotional clear during this important process.

Unlike all the other concepts, emotions—and EQ by extension—are the core of the human makeup.

Cognition

Cognition acts as our internal database of experience and knowledge that tells us which behavior and subsequent competence to pull from in order to reach our goal.

For example, we don’t pull from an extensive knowledge of classical music to set a path for reaching a financial goal. We would pull from our knowledge obtained in business school and/or our experience from last year’s financial strategy and use that specific, relevant experience and knowledge to travel down the most efficient path to reach our goal.

Behaviors

We’ve all known or interacted with a leader or manager who has amazing skills, but whose actions or behaviors are so off-putting that they overshadow their ability. The flipside would be someone in a leadership role who shows amazing effort and willingness to participate, but may not have the ability.

The ideal scenario is a leader who both behaves appropriately with respect to the organizational culture and has the level of acumen to properly support achieving the end goal.

Competency

Does the leader have the competence or capabilities to reach the end goal? If we say yes and stop there, we are short-changing the leader. Just because someone has the acumen doesn’t mean that they have the emotional fortitude to apply it.

Decision-Making

A leader’s ultimate goal is superior decision-making. Leaders are evaluated on their ability to make consistent, sound decisions in times of stress, crisis, and turmoil. Decision-making could also be replaced with higher sales goals, or better productivity. This is the end goal of our organization’s workforce—and our ultimate responsibility at work.

The better you understand yourself, the better you can facilitate higher levels of communication and collaboration with others.

Build leadership skills with emotional intelligence profile assessments at work.

Emotional intelligence is a key indicator of relational success in a leadership role at work. As a leader or manager, we need to understand our emotions, others’ emotions, and be able to quickly make adjustments to better suit the situational need. Our ability to recognize our own emotions helps us achieve the outcomes we’re seeking—both short-term and long-term.

Let’s take a look at how emotional intelligence (EQ) profile assessments turn good leaders into great leaders.

1. Identify your emotional intelligence (EQ) profile.

Emotional Intelligence

2. Recognize the emotional responses of others.

Emotional Intelligence

3. Make quick emotional adjustments to lead others.

Emotional Intelligence

1. Identify your emotional intelligence profile.

Emotional Intelligence

2. Recognize the emotional responses of others.

Emotional Intelligence

3. Make emotional adjustments to better lead others.

Emotional Intelligence

If we don’t possess the ability to emotionally pivot when it’s needed, we can inadvertently sabotage ourselves and those around us. Individuals in leadership roles with lower levels of emotional intelligence have a potential to:

  • Disengage employees
  • Create poor communication
  • Negatively affect the bottom line
On the positive side, individuals with higher levels of emotional intelligence have greater mental health, exemplary job performance, and strong leadership skills.

View a sample emotional intelligence (EQ) profile.

The EQ assessment creates your unique emotional intelligence profile. Your EQ profile includes an action plan for leadership development in the workplace. Your personal action plan is based upon your 5 dimensions of emotional intelligence.

We’re certified to measure and assess emotional intelligence so that you can advance your leadership development—and your success—at work.

Emotional Intelligence

View a sample emotional intelligence EQ profile.

The EQ assessment creates your unique emotional intelligence profile. Your EQ profile includes an action plan for leadership development in the workplace. Your personal action plan is based upon your 5 dimensions of emotional intelligence.

We’re certified to measure and assess emotional intelligence so that you can advance your leadership development—and your success—at work.

Emotional Intelligence

View a sample EQ profile.

Emotional Intelligence

The EQ assessment creates your unique emotional intelligence profile. Your EQ profile includes an action plan for leadership development in the workplace. Your personal action plan is based upon your 5 dimensions of emotional intelligence.

We’re certified to measure and assess emotional intelligence so that you can advance your leadership development—and your success—at work.

Emotional Intelligence

Emotional quotient (EQ) profiles measure 2 aspects of emotional intelligence: Self and Others.

Aspects of Self:

Understanding yourself includes your goals, intentions, responses, and behavior. Within the aspect of Self, EQ measures three dimensions:

  • Self-Awareness
  • Self-Regulation
  • Motivation
Aspects of Others:

Understanding others includes their feelings, their behavior, and their response to you. Within the aspect of Others, EQ measures two dimensions:

  • Social Awareness
  • Social Regulation

 

Emotional Quotient:
3 Dimensions of Self

Emotional Intelligence

Self-Awareness

Self-Awareness

Self-awareness is the ability to recognize and understand your own moods, emotions and drives. Because our thoughts precede our feelings, people with high levels of self-awareness are easily able to create a link between their thoughts and their feelings.

If you have high self-awareness, you are aware of your own emotions and how your emotions are affecting you, especially before making decisions. If you’re lower in self-awareness, you may not be aware how your behavior or decision making is under the direct influence of your current emotion.

Questions you can ask yourself to develop self-awareness:

  • What emotion am I experiencing right now?
  • Why am I experiencing that emotion?
  • How is that emotion influencing me right now?
Emotional Intelligence

Self-Regulation

Self-Regulation

Self-regulation is the ability to control or redirect your disruptive impulses and moods and your propensity to pause and think before reacting or making a decision. Self-regulation is not taking the emotion out of your decision-making, but understanding how your emotional state is directly impacting your decision-making at that moment.

If you have high self-regulation, you are more capable of acting appropriately during situations within a heightened emotional state. If you’re lower in self-regulation, you may find yourself over-reacting or incapable of regulating your emotions in public.

Questions you can ask yourself to develop self-regulation:

  • What could I do about my emotion right now?
  • Why should or shouldn’t I do something about it?
  • How can I more appropriately express my emotion right now?
Emotional Intelligence

Motivation

Motivation

Motivation is your passion to work for reasons that go beyond the external drive for knowledge, utility, surroundings, others, power or methodology. Motivation is based on your internal (intrinsic) drive to pursue goals with energy and persistence and is one of the most powerful drivers of decision-making and performance.

If you have high motivation, you are more consistent in making decisions that keep you driving toward your goals. If you’re lower in motivation, your decision-making will be inconsistent because you’ll be at the whim of your emotions.

Questions you can ask yourself to develop motivation:

  • What is my overarching goal?
  • Why is my goal important to me?
  • How can I use my current situation to get me closer to achieving my goal?

Emotional Quotient:
2 Dimensions of Others

Emotional Intelligence

Social Awareness

Social Awareness

Social awareness is your ability to understand the emotional makeup of other people and how your words and actions affect others. Social awareness is truly focusing on the other person’s emotions.

If you have high social awareness, you can accurately “read the room.” If you’re lower in social awareness, you risk misinterpreting other’s emotions or projecting how you’re feeling onto them.

Questions you can ask yourself to develop social awareness:

  • What are the emotions of other people right now?
  • Why are others feeling that way?
  • How are other people’s emotions impacting their decision-making and ability to perform?
Emotional Intelligence

Social Regulation

Social Regulation

Social regulation is your ability to influence the emotional clarity of others through your proficiency in managing relationships and building networks. Social regulation is often characterized as someone who is capable of other guiding other people’s emotions toward a more positive, productive state.

If you have high social regulation, you are able to respond to others in a way that builds rapport and common ground. If you’re lower in social regulation, you may behave in a way that suits you directly, but does not help to influence anyone else to a more appropriate emotional state.

Questions you can ask yourself to develop social regulation:

  • What could I do in this situation?
  • Why should or shouldn’t I do something?
  • How can I influence this situation to make it better for other people?
Recommended Reading

Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ

Daniel Goleman’s groundbreaking 1995 NYT bestseller argues that our emotions play a much greater role in our lives than we think and is not measured by IQ tests.

Recommended Reading: Daniel Goleman Emotional Intelligence

eBook: 10 Ways to Improve Your Emotional Intelligence

Successful leaders and superior performers tend to have superb emotional intelligence skills. Did you know that with a little hard work and some ambition, emotional intelligence can be developed over time?

Learn 10 ways to improve your emotional intelligence (EQ) with our free eBook.

Emotional intelligence can be developed > IQ cannot.

By the time we earn our first leadership or management role, we already know that IQ is critical to high performance at work. But what about emotional intelligence (EQ)? People become aware of EQ as they grow wiser and more fluent in the subtle nuances that are hallmarks of great leadership.

Success at work is determined by a combination of cognitive ability (IQ), emotional intelligence (EQ), and technical skill. Unfortunately, IQ cannot be enhanced (we are who we are). And technical skills will only get us so far. Ready for the great news?! Emotional intelligence (EQ) can be highly developed.

Organizations succeed because individuals come together as teams to work collaboratively. Did you know that an individual with the highest IQ cannot outperform a team with comparably mediocre IQ but higher EQ? This is because teams with higher levels of emotional intelligence collaborate more effectively.

“How’s your glass?”

Is your glass clear? How about cloudy? Are you seeing red? Using the metaphor of your emotional state being like a glass that is clear, cloudy or red, can help build a visualization of EQ.
Emotional Intelligence

The clear glass.

When our emotions are clear, we can work at our optimal level. We are making decisions with a clear head, and relating to others with an open-mind. A clear glass not only means that we have our emotions in check, but are motivated to regulate our emotions through tough scenarios.

A clear glass illustrates the absence of adverse emotional impact on a person’s work or decision-making ability. We make sound decisions for ourselves and others when we are clear.

Emotional Intelligence

The cloudy glass.

Just as a cloudy day hangs clouds over our heads, a cloudy glass indicates the presence of something that may be having a negative effect on our ability to regulate our emotions. The effect is not necessarily limited to the negative, but positive events as well. We can navigate through the cloudiness, but we may not be working at our optimal level.

A cloudy glass can clear-up if we work on our self-awareness and have the motivation to better regulate our emotions.

Emotional Intelligence

The red glass.

Many have heard of the phrase “seeing red,” and may have even experienced the concept themselves. A red glass, in this case, represents high emotions. Often associated with a negative emotion, there is the potential that your red is an extreme euphoria after an event that has an effect on decisions that follow.

Red is seen as a loss of self-control or the loss of the ability to regulate emotions. This means that we are not working at our optimal level and may want to avoid making decisions.

Emotional Intelligence

Stay compliant: Use only research-backed assessments.

Emotional Intelligence

We only use research-backed assessments that are HR compliant. Our assessments are used in over 90 countries to help improve individual and team performance.

In 2019, TTI SI conducted an Adverse Impact Study to ensure that its assessments are Safe Harbor-approved, non-discriminatory, and fully EEOC compliant.

Stay compliant: Only use assessments that are scientifically-proven to not cause disparate impact on protected groups.

Let’s work together.

Please use our email form to let us know how we can help you improve individual and team communication, collaboration, and employee engagement.

Ask us anything. We are here to help you.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

TeamTalent Consulting serves business leaders across the nation. We look forward to hearing from you!

Emotional Intelligence

Let's work together.

Please use our email form to let us know how we can help you. Ask us anything. We are here to help you.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

TeamTalent Consulting serves business leaders across the nation. We look forward to hearing from you!

We help leaders across the USA increase team performance, communication, and engagement.

SERVICES

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Emotional Intelligence (EQ)

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Emotional Intelligence
Emotional Intelligence
Emotional Intelligence

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